Pushing & Advancing NEW Pipe Design Ideas Out to All of You – Part 1

Pushing & Advancing NEW Pipe Design Ideas Out to All of You – Part 1

If all you have been doing is looking at & only buying older estate pipes, you may be missing out. There is a massive re-imagining of what pipe design is & what it can be, taking place right now. It’s pace is nothing short of amazing. It is as if a mini design explosion has occurred in the pipe world & new, unique & interesting design concepts are being created every day.

New design ideas will always generally fall into two categories. Workable new designs and those that simply do not.

A workable new design idea has a chance of being replicated & explored as a design concept by other artisan’s & through that effect, the new design idea has a chance to evolve, a chance to become something new & to hopefully, eventually reach it’s perfect form. It is simply how things work in the design world. Why? Because when a design idea is visually appealing, people get inspired by it & feel that they themselves have the ability to explore the concept further. When you see that taking place. That’s a strong design idea.

Just as we can decipher between a good bent billiard design and an even better one, so too can a new design idea eventually become.

New pipe design ideas take their form in a variety of ways. It can obviously come through a new pipe shape. It can be an idea for a visual pipe accessory. It can be a particular use of an adornment. New pipe design ideas are being created at this very moment & they are actively shaping the future of pipe making.

If you are on social media outlets or certain pipe forums, you have seen some or most of these designs and it is nothing new. Appreciating the design concept nonetheless does require a bit of reflection. Thoughtful analysis in fact. When you see these new designs, the first questions that should be asked are; Does the design work? Can it be better?

Believe it or not, but is these odd shapes that the Stanwell, Peterson, Savinelli and Big Ben pipe factory companies of the world will some day bring into their flock. Make no doubt about it, do not be surprised to see some portion of these designs in those companies pipe stables.

So if you don’t want to be surprised in 10 years when you see these new designs at a much greater level, beyond the individual artisan level, start following some of what is going on in this field today.

 Here are some new design ideas, some of them still very raw but all very promising & interesting nonetheless.

 

Daniel Mustran – Playing with a new form of Reverse Calabash. Dedicating special attention & dividing or separating the bowl from the rear chamber and giving us a new view.

I saw Daniel produce this shape the first time over a year ago. I am not sure if he came up with this idea but this particular expression of it, seemed to spawn some new ideas in other pipe-makers, as you will shortly see.

Daniel Mustran – Playing with a new form of Reverse Calabash. Dedicating special attention & dividing or separating the bowl from the rear chamber and giving us a new view.

Daniel Mustran – Playing with a new form of Reverse Calabash. Dedicating special attention & dividing or separating the bowl from the rear chamber and giving us a new view.

Daniel Mustran – Playing with a new form of Reverse Calabash. Dedicating special attention & dividing or separating the bowl from the rear chamber and giving us a new view.

Andrey Savenko takes his turn at the concept and applies a few interesting alterations. The bowl is obviously exaggerated in it’s length. The other fun part is that he merges the two forms in a more organic manner. This variation has a more unified, less two-piece view but interesting nonetheless.

Andrey Savenko takes his turn at the concept and applies a few interesting alterations. The bowl is obviously exaggerated in it’s length. The other fun part is that he merges the two forms in a more organic manner. This variation has a more unified, less two-piece view but interesting nonetheless.

This side-view really highlights the idea of merging the two forms into one.

Andrey Savenko takes his turn at the concept and applies a few interesting alterations. The bowl is obviously exaggerated in it’s length. The other fun part is that he merges the two forms in a more organic manner. This variation has a more unified, less two-piece view but interesting nonetheless.

Andrey Savenko takes his turn at the concept and applies a few interesting alterations. The bowl is obviously exaggerated in it’s length. The other fun part is that he merges the two forms in a more organic manner. This variation has a more unified, less two-piece view but interesting nonetheless.

His design creates the feeling of two blocks being heated and melting together & then having cooled into some wild form.

Andrey Savenko takes his turn at the concept and applies a few interesting alterations. The bowl is obviously exaggerated in it’s length. The other fun part is that he merges the two forms in a more organic manner. This variation has a more unified, less two-piece view but interesting nonetheless.

Andrey Savenko takes his turn at the concept and applies a few interesting alterations. The bowl is obviously exaggerated in it’s length. The other fun part is that he merges the two forms in a more organic manner. This variation has a more unified, less two-piece view but interesting nonetheless.

The next artisan, Valera Rijenko, seems to have been taken by this general design idea as well. Valera however has added a few additional design steps to his evaluation process. He obviously first played with the original concept first but slowly, he then began doing something new & he joined the design idea to a traditional shape design.

Valera Rijenko exploring the general ‘Two-Piece’ concept beautifully. The Bamboo makes for a natural ‘foundation’ so to speak, upon which he rests the briar bowl. A pleasantly natural composition.

Valera Rijenko exploring another variation of the same theme. This time adding a good amount of flare to the front part of the pipe. He is also beginning to see the design idea interact with the harder, more straight lines, you see in the bowl.

The next part is Valera’s big step ahead. The application of the design idea to the traditional shape of a BullDog.  Joining these two design ‘theories’ produces some rather unique imagery & some interesting, visually delightful & thoughtful material.

Valera Rijenko doing a hard mix of old & new design. What a unique result. Hard to look away from when you first see it. Things somehow feel wrong but also so right at the same time. The funny result of the confluence of two ideas, old & new. It should be noted that this is not a double chamber design.

Valera Rijenko doing a hard mix of old & new design. What a unique result. Hard to look away from when you first see it. Things somehow feel wrong but also so right at the same time. The funny result of the confluence of two ideas, old & new. It should be noted that this is not a double chamber design.

Valera Rijenko, clearly liking the design concept a lot, goes full steam ahead on it & takes it to this unique, highly exaggerated geometric level. This pipe has a lot of movement to it. Almost like it’s dancing.

Valera Rijenko, clearly liking the design concept a lot, goes full steam ahead on it & takes it to this unique, highly exaggerated geometric level. This pipe has a lot of movement to it. Almost like it’s dancing.

Valera Rijenko, clearly liking the design concept a lot, goes full steam ahead on it & takes it to this unique, highly exaggerated geometric level. This pipe has a lot of movement to it. Almost like it’s dancing.

Valera Rijenko, clearly liking the design concept a lot, goes full steam ahead on it & takes it to this unique, highly exaggerated geometric level. This pipe has a lot of movement to it. Almost like it’s dancing.

Valera Rijenko, now moving back-wards but with his new found information. He removes the front part of the pipe, previously defining the lower ‘bottom’ of the pipe. He then uses his new-found knowledge to the back of the pipe, creating an interestingly unique and exaggerated thin rear.

Valera Rijenko, now moving back-wards but with his new found information. He removes the front part of the pipe, previously defining the lower ‘bottom’ of the pipe. He then uses his new-found knowledge to the back of the pipe, creating an interestingly unique and exaggerated thin rear.

Valera Rijenko, now moving back-wards but with his new found information. He removes the front part of the pipe, previously defining the lower ‘bottom’ of the pipe. He then uses his new-found knowledge to the back of the pipe, creating an interestingly unique and exaggerated thin rear.

Valera Rijenko, now moving back-wards but with his new found information. He removes the front part of the pipe, previously defining the lower ‘bottom’ of the pipe. He then uses his new-found knowledge to the back of the pipe, creating an interestingly unique and exaggerated thin rear.

Rounding out the new pipe design ideas as they relate to shapes, we have a design idea from Roger Wallenstein.

Roger Wallenstein is playing with the fun idea of squishing the pipe bowl. As if the briar is some soft & pliable material & someone just sat on it & the weight would not hold. I enjoy that visual effect, at least as I seem to see it.

Roger Wallenstein playing with the fun idea of squishing the pipe bowl. As if the briar is some soft & pliable material & someone just sat on it & the weight would not hold. I enjoy that visual effect, at least as I seem to see it.

Let’s see what’s new & interesting in the pipe adornments arena. The common ferrule has been around for a long time. From horns to colorful materials, all having the purpose of giving the pipe an extra ‘accent’ or some added unique visual flavor.

Sam Cui starts with this shape. The Revyagin ‘two-chamber’ expression. And by the way, that joint, is one the cleanest and most elegant pipe connections I have seen in some time.

Sam Cui takes this shape and adds a fun element to it. He places the ring in the perfect spot.

Sam Cui. Almost instantly, it appears to fit in so well. Like it belongs there. Like it was missing from the design and waiting to be applied.

It should be noted that it is clear that Sam’s inspiration for this idea is likely connected to his heritage. Thinking in this thoughtful, gentle & very delicate adornment design manner, clearly comes from his own personal experience with his culture. Sam Cui is Chinese and his cultural heritage is shining through in this example.

Sam Cui and his culture, joining forces to give us this interesting new pipe design adornment idea. Beautiful.

Sam Cui. With such a unique and interesting adornment, Sam knew it was something special and took it further. He had to give the pipe an overall grander presentation.

Sam Cui. Showing the entire idea off in all it’s glory. I like the height he selected from which to hang the pipe. All of this extra work he did was simply his big respect for the design idea. He felt it deserved that much attention & the final result is just great.

Sam Cui. Showing the entire idea off in all it’s glory. I like the height he selected from which to hang the pipe. All of this extra work he did was simply his big respect for the design idea. He felt it deserved that much attention & the final result is just great.

Michail Revyagin. Sticking with the fun idea of general adornments. Michail is always pushing far ahead in this realm and leading a big charge. Here he shows us that he is either applying a pleasant level of visual symmetry and balance, or possibly plugging up a hole he placed in the rear chamber or maybe even covering up a flaw. Whatever it is, the final result is just fantastic to look at.

Michail Revyagin. Sticking with the fun idea of general adornments. Michail is always pushing far ahead in this realm and leading a big charge. Here he shows us that he is either applying a pleasant level of visual symmetry and balance, or possibly plugging up a hole he placed in the rear chamber or maybe even covering up a flaw. Whatever it is, the final result is just fantastic to look at.

I should take the average short attention span of people, which includes myself sometimes, much more into account. Let’s continue the new pipe design idea review early next week.

There is much more to look at. We’ll keep reviewing & exploring some of the newest design ideas that have the most unique elements & the most potential to be further explored.

 

ENJOY SOME MORE FANTASTIC PIPE PICS & MORE PIPE COMMENTARY.
BY FOLLOWING ME ON INSTAGRAM

Instagram

Copyright © 2014. TobaccoDays.com. All rights reserved.

Share This Post

9 Comments

  1. Google Plus - March 20, 2014

    David M via Google+7 hours ago –
    If all you have been doing is looking at & only buying older estate pipes, you may be missing out. There is a massive re-imagining of what pipe design is, taking place right now. It’s pace is nothing short of amazing. It is as if a mini design explosion has occurred in the pipe world & new, unique & interesting design concepts are being created every day.
    +4

  2. Corey Kelly - March 20, 2014

    Holy cow… those are amazing!
    +2

  3. Eric Boehm - March 20, 2014

    Very interesting. An immense level of craftsmanship and a highly imaginative take on the classic tobacco pipe. Be interesting to see where these ideas lead to in the future.

  4. David M. - March 21, 2014

    Yes, that Sam Cui pipe is pretty amazing Michael.
    That ring was all cut from the same chunk of briar.
    And yes, it is in fact a Reversed Calabash two-chamber pipe.

Leave a reply