Pushing & Advancing NEW Pipe Design Ideas Out to All of You – Part 2

Pushing & Advancing NEW Pipe Design Ideas Out to All of You – Part 2

This is a continuation of where we left off last week with Part 1 – which can be read here, if you need to start from the beginning.

Brief intro again:

If all you have been doing is looking at & only buying older estate pipes, you may be missing out. There is a massive re-imagining of what pipe design is & what it can be, taking place right now. It’s pace is nothing short of amazing. It is as if a mini design explosion has occurred in the pipe world & new, unique & interesting design concepts are being created every day.

New design ideas will always generally fall into two categories. Workable new designs and those that simply do not.

New pipe design ideas take their form in a variety of ways. It can obviously come through a new pipe shape. It can be an idea for a visual pipe accessory. It can be a particular use of an adornment. New pipe design ideas are being created at this very moment & they are actively shaping the future of pipe making. Appreciating the design concept nonetheless does require a bit of reflection. Thoughtful analysis in fact. When you see these new designs, the first questions that should be asked are; Does the design work? Can it be better?

Believe it or not, but is these odd shapes that the Stanwell, Peterson, Savinelli and Big Ben pipe factory companies of the world will some day bring into their flock. Make no doubt about it, do not be surprised to see some portion of these designs in those companies pipe stables.

So if you don’t want to be surprised in 10 years when you see these new designs at a much greater level, beyond the individual artisan level, start following some of what is going on in this field today.

 Here are some new design ideas, some of them still very raw but all very promising & interesting nonetheless.

Last week we were mid-way through the process of evaluating new pipe design ideas in the ‘Accessories/Adornments’ front. Let’s continue.

Michail Revyagin is again exploring adornments in fun new ways. Although this particular expression, the placement of red dots, is not in itself a specific design idea people may attach themselves to, it still highlights a new design direction of adding fun elements to the ‘rear’ part of the pipe & giving this area new & added interest.

Michail Revyagin – It can even be said that this specific accessories expression is particularly feminine. Nothing wrong with that and still, this simple addition to the pipe and the pleasant visual excitement it creates is undeniable. We will see much more this.

Michail Revyagin – It can even be said that this specific accessories expression is particularly feminine. Nothing wrong with that and still, this simple addition to the pipe and the pleasant visual excitement it creates is undeniable. We will see much more this.

Since we have been sticking around the rear pipe area, the next ‘new pipe design’ development reviews the new interest in treating the regular stem in a more interesting manner.

The stem & the area surrounding it, now has the ability to take an active role in the entire design of the pipe.

Viktor Yashtylov – Known for making pipes on the level of Faberge Eggs has spent a great deal of time exploring this portion of the pipe. Today, his stems are an integral part in the entire pipe’s design. As in this pipe, the stem area is guiding the overall pipe design and feel.

Viktor Yashtylov – Known for making pipes on the level of Faberge Eggs has spent a great deal of time exploring this portion of the pipe. Today, his stems are an integral part in the entire pipe’s design. As in this pipe, the stem area is guiding the overall pipe design and feel.

Viktor Yashtylov – Known for making pipes on the level of Faberge Eggs has spent a great deal of time exploring this portion of the pipe. Today, his stems are an integral part in the entire pipe’s design. As in this pipe, the stem area is guiding the overall pipe design and feel.

Viktor Yashtylov – Known for making pipes on the level of Faberge Eggs has spent a great deal of time exploring this portion of the pipe. Today, his stems are an integral part in the entire pipe’s design. As in this pipe, the stem area is guiding the overall pipe design and feel.

The stem & the attached accessory below it, in essence start the visual review of the pipe. The added layers are pushing down into the briar and grounding much of the remaining pipe design. It’s incredible to see. TobaccoDays wrote a specific blurb on Viktor Yashtylov’s stem design & reviewed the process through which his stems have gone through over the years. Starting from Viktor’s basic stems impacting the pipe in a regular manner, all the way to the beautiful type of stem expressions you see here. You can read about Viktor’s Stem Design Evolution here.

Viktor Yashtylov – Known for making pipes on the level of Faberge Eggs has spent a great deal of time exploring this portion of the pipe. Today, his stems are an integral part in the entire pipe’s design. As in this pipe, the stem area is guiding the overall pipe design and feel.

Viktor Yashtylov – Known for making pipes on the level of Faberge Eggs has spent a great deal of time exploring this portion of the pipe. Today, his stems are an integral part in the entire pipe’s design. As in this pipe, the stem area is guiding the overall pipe design and feel.

Viktor Yashtylov – Known for making pipes on the level of Faberge Eggs has spent a great deal of time exploring this portion of the pipe. Today, his stems are an integral part in the entire pipe’s design. As in this pipe, the stem area is guiding the overall pipe design and feel.

Viktor Yashtylov – Known for making pipes on the level of Faberge Eggs has spent a great deal of time exploring this portion of the pipe. Today, his stems are an integral part in the entire pipe’s design. As in this pipe, the stem area is guiding the overall pipe design and feel.

Another pipe-maker who often plays with the ebonite stem material is Boris Starkov.

Boris is always exploring new ways to have the stem aid his overall pipe designs.

Boris Starkov – He takes the stem and allows it to give added visual weight to the pipe. Rather than a thin, lanky piece, he turns it into extra art by giving it legs. The placement of those legs is critical in this piece. He raises them up to frame the wave in the briar and gives the wave a new focal point. The V-shape is not coincidental, it is following the exterior lines of the briar wave. All in all, Boris ends up erecting a new visual foundation for the piece, from all angles.

Boris Starkov – He takes the stem and allows it to give added visual weight to the pipe. Rather than a thin, lanky piece, he turns it into extra art by giving it legs. The placement of those legs is critical in this piece. He raises them up to frame the wave in the briar and gives the wave a new focal point. The V-shape is not coincidental, it is following the exterior lines of the briar wave. All in all, Boris ends up erecting a new visual foundation for the piece, from all angles.

Boris Starkov – He takes the stem and allows it to give added visual weight to the pipe. Rather than a thin, lanky piece, he turns it into extra art by giving it legs. The placement of those legs is critical in this piece. He raises them up to frame the wave in the briar and gives the wave a new focal point. The V-shape is not coincidental, it is following the exterior lines of the briar wave. All in all, Boris ends up erecting a new visual foundation for the piece, from all angles.

Boris Starkov – He takes the stem and allows it to give added visual weight to the pipe. Rather than a thin, lanky piece, he turns it into extra art by giving it legs. The placement of those legs is critical in this piece. He raises them up to frame the wave in the briar and gives the wave a new focal point. The V-shape is not coincidental, it is following the exterior lines of the briar wave. All in all, Boris ends up erecting a new visual foundation for the piece, from all angles.

Boris Starkov – He takes the stem and allows it to give added visual weight to the pipe. Rather than a thin, lanky piece, he turns it into extra art by giving it legs. The placement of those legs is critical in this piece. He raises them up to frame the wave in the briar and gives the wave a new focal point. The V-shape is not coincidental, it is following the exterior lines of the briar wave. All in all, Boris ends up erecting a new visual foundation for the piece, from all angles.

A very exciting new area of pipe design is also taking shape in the ‘adornments’ arena but with a much heavier attention to general visual weight. Specifically, new materials are being added in large chunks to parts of the pipe shape. New materials beyond my beloved horn.

Strange and odd materials get mixed together with polymers, which are essentially synthetic plastics. The concoction dries and the results are absolutely striking. There is no doubt about it that more and more pipe-makers will soon be playing a lot more than usual with this new area of pipe design.

Roman Kovalev essentially has a mini science lab in his work-shop. He is constantly experimenting, mostly with natural materials & polymers and the results are very interesting. No matter how odd & strange these materials appear at first glance, it is undeniable that this style of dedicated approach is giving us something very new & exciting to look at.

Roman Kovalev essentially has a mini science lab in his work-shop. He is constantly experimenting, mostly with natural materials & polymers and the results are very interesting. No matter how odd & strange these materials appear at first glance, it is undeniable that this style of dedicated approach is giving us something very new & exciting to look at.

Once the mixture dries, the artisan has an entire new block of ‘medium’ to play with. To add to any portion of the pipe, either front or rear. The level of interest sky-rockets. Technically this idea is not new. Many other pipe-makers have done this before. Roman however is taking it to such a whole new level that he gives us the opportunity to really see the potential of this new pipe design idea.

Roman Kovalev essentially has a mini science lab in his work-shop. He is constantly experimenting, mostly with natural materials & polymers and the results are very interesting. No matter how odd & strange these materials appear at first glance, it is undeniable that this style of dedicated approach is giving us something very new & exciting to look at.

This particular artisan and his experimenting with these materials, as you see them, is literally in it’s infancy. This area of pipe design has just begun it’s design exploration. There is so much more to come in this ‘new materials added to pipe design’ arena.

Roman Kovalev takes the insides of this Maroni nut & turns it into this.

Roman Kovalev – Maroni mixed with polymers to form the cap and rear part of the shank.

Roman Kovalev – Maroni mixed with polymers to form the cap and rear part of the shank.

Roman Kovalev – Maroni mixed with polymers to form the cap and rear part of the shank.

Roman Kovalev – Those are polymerized leaves from an Oak Tree. Beautiful. Notice the stark difference in feeling when he uses either a dark or very light polymer. There is so much room for experimentation in this area.

Roman Kovalev – Those are polymerized leaves from an Oak Tree. Beautiful. Notice the stark difference in feeling when he uses either a dark or very light polymer. There is so much room for experimentation in this area.

Roman Kovalev – This time polymerizing some pine needles. No matter how large or small of a piece an artisan will use, this design idea produces fantastic results.

Roman Kovalev – This time polymerizing some pine needles. No matter how large or small of a piece an artisan will use, this design idea produces fantastic results.

Roman Kovalev – This time polymerizing some pine needles. No matter how large or small of a piece an artisan will use, this design idea produces fantastic results.

Michael Parks has been experimenting with this new material process on his pipes for many years. Many other artisan’s are also getting bored with the standard materials that make up pipes. As seen in the next example.

Kei-Ichi Gotoh and Tom Eltang (GoTang) show us the cap from their joint collaboration pipe that is made from stabilized mammoth ivory. The dynamic visual fun going on inside that cap is brilliant. All of that brilliance stems from the simple utilization of a new material to add to the pipe’s overall design aesthetic.

In my mind, that concludes the majority of what I believe are the most significant & the most important ‘new pipe design idea’ advances taking place in the pipe world today. It is these general design ideas, shown to you through various examples from various artisans, that will lead the design charge moving forward.

Pipe design is changing. Sometimes and very often this change is going into new directions that are difficult to accept.

Visually speaking, one looks at many of these pipe design ideas and one wants to turn their head away. Ignoring these ideas however will be futile. These pipe design ideas are good & because of that, they are actively being worked on & it is these ideas that will eventually shape the future of pipe design. It is in our interest to neither ignore them, nor to dismiss them.

It is these design ideas that we will see the most of in the future and their further exploration will only refine them further and make them eventually that much more appealing. It’s all very exciting really & thank the heavens that we have artisan’s pushing themselves & pipe design in general, into new directions. Imagine what it would be like without these new advances?

I want to end this piece by looking at two final shapes I have seen this past year that caught my eye for various reasons.

Holger Gunia and Manfred Hortig – The collaboration on this piece produced a unique result. Kind of a hanging bowl effect. As if the bowl was attached to the shank, after the shank was completed. This particular piece is wildly curvy in it’s expression but the general idea of separating, yet attaching the bowl to it’s usual spot creates a lot of visual interest. Something that may be worth exploring more.

Holger Gunia and Manfred Hortig – The collaboration on this piece produced a unique result. Kind of a hanging bowl effect. As if the bowl was attached to the shank, after the shank was completed. This particular piece is wildly curvy in it’s expression but the general idea of separating, yet attaching the bowl to it’s usual spot creates a lot of visual interest. Something that may be worth exploring more.

Holger Gunia and Manfred Hortig – The collaboration on this piece produced a unique result. Kind of a hanging bowl effect. As if the bowl was attached to the shank, after the shank was completed. This particular piece is wildly curvy in it’s expression but the general idea of separating, yet attaching the bowl to it’s usual spot creates a lot of visual interest. Something that may be worth exploring more.

Holger Gunia and Manfred Hortig – The collaboration on this piece produced a unique result. Kind of a hanging bowl effect. As if the bowl was attached to the shank, after the shank was completed. This particular piece is wildly curvy in it’s expression but the general idea of separating, yet attaching the bowl to it’s usual spot creates a lot of visual interest. Something that may be worth exploring more.

Sergey Ailarov – This piece obviously displays the organic side of pipe design. I cannot stop staring at this pipe. Essentially I think that this is one of the most perfect expressions of ‘organic’ that I have seen in quite some time. Outside of the stem, I don’t think there is a single spot on this pipe where the line terminates. The entire surface area of this pipe is composed of one long and immense and very perfectly organic line. Just a beautiful piece expressing the idea of ‘organic’, almost to perfection.

Sergey Ailarov – This piece obviously displays the organic side of pipe design. I cannot stop staring at this pipe. Essentially I think that this is one of the most perfect expressions of ‘organic’ that I have seen in quite some time. Outside of the stem, I don’t think there is a single spot on this pipe where the line terminates. The entire surface area of this pipe is composed of one long and immense and very perfectly organic line. Just a beautiful piece expressing the idea of ‘organic’, almost to perfection.

Sergey Ailarov – This piece obviously displays the organic side of pipe design. I cannot stop staring at this pipe. Essentially I think that this is one of the most perfect expressions of ‘organic’ that I have seen in quite some time. Outside of the stem, I don’t think there is a single spot on this pipe where the line terminates. The entire surface area of this pipe is composed of one long and immense and very perfectly organic line. Just a beautiful piece expressing the idea of ‘organic’, almost to perfection.

 

ENJOY SOME MORE FANTASTIC PIPE PICS & MORE PIPE COMMENTARY.
BY FOLLOWING ME ON INSTAGRAM

Instagram

Copyright © 2014. TobaccoDays.com. All rights reserved.

Share This Post

13 Comments

  1. Eric Boehm - April 5, 2014

    Mar 26, 2014

    Very nice. Thanks for the interesting read.

  2. Amy John - April 5, 2014

    Anything new in designs are really interesting for me and thanks for sharing the post

  3. Dan Coomer - May 8, 2014

    The level of creativity of the designers in these two articles is phenomenal. Truly cutting edge stuff.

Leave a reply